By David Cramer

David Cramer

David Cramer

I believe that it is inconsistent for one to be a strong complementarian and a Protestant at the same time. Complementarians often hold that, though women can be involved in various forms of ministry, they cannot become “ordained ministers.” But consider the following simple argument:

According to one of the fundamental tenets of Protestantism, the priesthood of all believers (hereafter, PAB):

(1) All baptized believers are ordained by God as priests.

From here the rest of the argument quickly follows:

(2) Some women are baptized believers.

Therefore,

(3) Some women are ordained by God as priests. Read More…


Although 59% of Catholics support the ordination of women, the Vatican continues to list the ordination of women as a grave crime in the same category as sexually abusing children. Both are punishable by defrocking or excommunication. More than once the Vatican has made good on that promise.

Read NBC’s account of Bill Brennan, a 92-year-old Jesuit priest who lost his collar for celebrating the mass with an ordained woman in Columbus, Georgia. Brennan is the third priest within the last month dismissed for advocating women’s ordination. The Rev. Helmut Schueller, an Austrian priest, was stripped of his right to use the title “monsignor” for advocating the right of women to be ordained to the priesthood. The Rev. Ray Bourgeois was dismissed last month for the same reason. Bourgeois has written an e-book, available free online, called My Journey from Silence to Solidarity.

Despite the Vatican’s stance against women priests, a handful of Roman Catholic women have been ordained to the priesthood by sympathetic bishops. What does it say that the Vatican not only opposes priests, and not only lumps them together with child molesters, but also attacks any male priest who associates or stands up for women priests?

Discuss in the comments section. To stand up for women in every corner of the body of Christ, sign our petition at Change.org.

 


By Jody Stowell

The Rev. Jody Stowell

Almost a week has passed since I was sitting, nervous, jittery and hopeful on the edge of my seat, in the public gallery in Church House, Westminster.  I was waiting for the voting figures to be called, first the bishops, then the clergy, and finally the laity.

Since that moment it has been all at once interesting – in a way that a disinterested observer might watch a newly discovered tribe order themselves by strange alien customs – and painful, so that the grief cycle of disbelief, anger, sadness is completed a number of times every day.

The most surprising emotion that I experienced this week was the sense of shame that rested upon me on the Wednesday morning.  I felt that I simply did not exist at the same level of priestliness as my male colleagues. I have heard a lot about ‘second-class’ citizens in this debate – whether it is in defence of making sure that women bishops are equally bishops, or, distastefully in my opinion, the cries of ‘second-class’ status that those who are ‘anti’ claim. However, I had not expected to feel like a second-class priest.  After all, isn’t this about bishops?  Not priests.

So, why this is not just about ‘Women Bishops’? Read More…


By Sarah Cokley, ABC Religion & Ethics

In a miasma of negative publicity, the General Synod of the Church of England has just voted against its current Measure to allow women priests to be consecrated as bishops.

But the loss was a narrow and strange one. A two thirds majority is needed in all three “Houses” – Bishops, Clergy and Laity – and the Measure lost by merely six votes in the House of Laity, having passed easily in the other two Houses, and having received overall a handsome numerical majority. Recent elections to Synod allowed conservatives (both Catholic and Evangelical) to push forward more candidates into the House of Laity with precisely this vote in mind; and it has long been noted that the House of Laity contains more than its expected share of conservative, elderly or bureaucratically-inclined church people.

Yet in a tortuously long process of reflection and discussion leading up to this final vote, 42 of the 44 diocesan synods in the Church of England had voted for the Measure. Hence, the “No” vote constitutes a real crisis in representational structures in the Synod, as well as a noted new tension between Church and State. The Prime Minister – doubtless scenting a vote-puller – has not been slow to express his dismay at the outcome; and since the whole future of the House of Lords (and the presence of bishops in it) currently hangs in the balance, further pressure could in principle be applied by the government on the Church on this score: no women bishops, no representation in the House of Lords? We shall see. Read the full story here.